Archive for January 2018

Neil Buchanan

This guide is intended to be a useful reference for companies preparing their 31 December 2017 pensions accounting disclosures, whether under FRS 102 or IAS 19.

In this guide we will review the changes in the investment markets over the last 12 months and consider the impact these will have had on a typical pension scheme. We will also review recent developments in the area of pensions accounting, highlighting issues that you should be aware of.

Download your report

To discuss these topics further, please contact Spence through your usual contact or connect with our Corporate Advisory practice associate, Angela Burns, or by telephone on 0141 331 9984.

Andrew Kerrin

Another year, another mixed bag for the pensions industry.  Looking back, with its final quarter now closed, 2017 was a year that threatened change (the Work and Pension Committee’s review and subsequent Green Paper on DB schemes, and the much-anticipated ban on cold-calling) but that ultimately saw pensions taking a back-seat to the political beast that has become the Brexit negotiations.

That’s not to say that pensions weren’t firmly in the headlines, with the collapse of schemes adorning household names, and some significant decisions coming from the courts (not least the Walker v Innospec decision on same-sex spousal benefits).  However, the final quarter of 2017 brought some significant announcements and stories that promise to keep trustees and sponsoring employers busy during the next 12 months.

So, we have collated all of the most important topics from the 3 months to 31 December 2017 into a bite size report, to let you sign off on 2017 and get ready for 2018. Enjoy your Quarterly Update!

The seasonal topics of this quarter include:

  • Anti-Money Laundering Regulations
  • Latest news from the PPF
  • VAT on DB scheme management costs
  • MIFID II and the regulation of investment firms
  • Bank of England interest rates
  • Transfer value redress
  • 21st Century Trusteeship

To download this report click here.

As always we love to get feedback from you. If you like what we do please tell us – it’s nice to get great feedback. If you would like things included, excluded or done differently please drop us a line too. The report is to help you, so help us tailor it to your needs.

And … if you find that you do have time to keep up with things, why not follow us on Twitter @SpencePartners and keep up to date as you go along.

David Davison

In past bulletins I have highlighted the lunacy of organisations in LGPS Funds being forced to continue to build pension liabilities beyond the point where they are affordable. Organisations are stuck, continuing to build more and more benefits for their staff, focussing contributions on new benefits rather than looking to pay down the legacy liabilities they’ve already built up.

Organisations have the Hobson’s choice of an unaffordable exit debt or continuing accrual driven by LGPS Regulations which are patently not fit for purpose.

At last there seems to be a glimmer of hope that the problem has finally been recognised and an acceptance that these Regulations need to be changed to better protect scheme employers as a whole, and indeed the Funds themselves.

In a previous Bulletin, I highlighted the work ICAS in Scotland had undertaken to encourage Scottish Government to review the Regulations and, as a result of this the Scottish Public Pension Agency communicated a commitment to review the Regulations and issue a consultation with their proposals. True to their word a consultation was issued on 6 November 2017 with a closing date of 15 January 2018.

The consultation proposes material changes to Regulation 62 (equivalent to Regulation 64 in England & Wales) which would allow ‘exiting employers’ to cease building up future benefits but without the imposition of a gilts based cessation debt, something which is unaffordable for most. This would be via the use of a ‘suspension notice’ where Funds could agree to let employers continue to participate, effectively on an ‘on-going’ basis, with a continuing contribution commitment to the Fund. Such an approach would assist in dealing with this ‘Hobson’s choice.’

I greatly welcome the SPPA’s approach although the detail still, in my view, needs some refinement.

ICAS has provided a response to the consultation which highlights some issues and makes further practical proposals how these may be resolved.

I can only hope that the proposals are implemented (with some pragmatic amendments) and that England, Wales and Northern Ireland look to follow suit. It can only be in everyone’s interests.

David Davison

I was reading through an LGPS annual report for 2017 this week (I know, I get all the fun jobs I hear you cry!) and was struck by a comment about the scheme membership continuing to grow and linking that to the health of the scheme and it’s relative attractiveness. This ‘positive spin’ wasn’t wholly in line with my experience so I decided to do a bit of digging to see if the statements actually held water.

Trawling through some old scheme records I identified that the scheme membership had indeed grown by about 50% over the 10 years to 2017. However, when you looked a bit more closely the increases were driven more by rising numbers of deferred members, which had more than doubled. The active membership had only increased by about 29% over the period.

So this meant that the active members, i.e. those actually contributing to the scheme, had fallen as a percentage of overall membership from over 52% in 2007 to less than 46% by 2017.

Over approximately the same period the pensionable salary roll for active members had increased by about 26% with deferred pensions increasing by around 80% and pensions in payment by over 88%.

This led me to look at a few other LGPS reports and the position is broadly consistent, demonstrating something of a trend.

So what this means is that the salary increase and active membership numbers have increased by a relatively consistent amount so the future accruing liabilities are broadly consistent. However it does mean that proportionately there’s a smaller number of those funding any deficit contributions related to deferred and pensioner members and paying for the costs of running the scheme.

So the picture isn’t quite a rosy as the statement would lead you to believe. It’s also a position that’s not wholly surprising.

Given that public sector pay rises were frozen for two years from 2010 and then 1% until this year the average annual salary rise in the public sector over the last seven years has been around 1.5%.

However, CPI over the same period has been 2.3% a year. So active member benefits (linked to salary have been going up at a significantly lower rate over the period than the increases on deferred benefits and for pensioners.

However, this isn’t the whole story. In 2014 in England, Wales & Northern Ireland and 2015 in Scotland the LGPS Scheme moved from a final salary basis to a CARE basis so this means that active participants are likely to have benefitted from higher increases on their pension benefits accrued after this date than they have their salaries, and this on a higher accruing figure (i.e. 1/49th per annum vs the previous 1/60th). So while salary benefits may have been losing value in real terms that’s not wholly the position in relation to pension benefits. A ‘healthy’ position for individuals but possibly not quite so healthy for the Funds! If we are to see salaries begin to rise in the public sector over the next few years then this will be something of a ‘double whammy’ for funds.

So, the claim of materially reduced costs as a result of the 2014/15 changes has proven to be something of a con, and indeed something that many admitted bodies will have witnessed first hand.

You may therefore not want to take the healthiness of your LGPS scheme funding from Fund comments about the growth of the membership as things are far from as simple, or indeed as positive, as suggested.

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