Archive for August 2017

David Davison

As Frank Field, Chair of the Parliamentary Work & Pensions Committee, writes to the Trustees of USS, the Pension Regulator and ministers about the record deficit position the Scheme now finds itself in, I wanted to consider if the Scheme is a victim of circumstance or are there any lessons to be learned. Read more »

Hugh Nolan

Politics and Pensions

The world is a very uncertain place at the moment and strangely that might mean a period of relative stability for UK pension regulations. The main reason for optimism about such stability is simply that Parliament will have to focus so heavily on Brexit issues that there will be no time for another Pensions Act any time soon. The second reason is that there doesn’t seem to be any real appetite for any major change, despite the loud shouting from various parties on many, many sides. Read more »

Hugh Nolan

The Government recently announced that the State Pension Age will increase to 68 in 2037 – seven years earlier then planned. This may seem odd given current news about longevity improvements slowing down but it actually makes perfect sense.

The first State Pension in the UK was introduced in 1908 and paid the 25% of people who reached age 70 for an average of 9 years. The Basic State Pension came in from 1948 and allowed people to retire at 65, with a life expectancy of 12 years. But, by 2014 this had risen to 21 years (for men) so it’s no wonder that something had to give. Read more »

Gino Rocco

The Supreme Court has provided some welcome clarification on how a person’s rights or interests in a pension arrangement should be treated as matrimonial property in divorce cases.

Facts

The facts of the case are that Mr McDonald, who was the respondent in the case, was a member of the British Coal Staff Superannuation Scheme (the “Scheme”).

Mrs McDonald sought a pension sharing order from the Scottish Courts on her divorce from Mr McDonald, on the basis that his pension forms part of the matrimonial property which is taken into account in the financial settlement. Read more »

David Davison

In an earlier bulletin, I looked at why the current basis of cessation for admitted bodies in LGPS was causing problems and how the inconsistency of approaches taken by Funds meant that organisations struggled to understand their obligations and what steps were open to them to address the issues they face.  You can read the bulletin entitled ‘An alternative approach to cessation’ here.

In some work undertaken over the last few months I’ve identified that some Funding Strategy Statements (‘FSS’) revised over the last couple of years seem to suggest that some Funds are taking tentative steps to try to address the situation. Read more »

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